fukushima-page-001.jpg
       
     
  The streets remain empty and quiet after the disaster in Namie, Japan. Residents haven't been allowed to move back until the radiation has reached the government's level of safety. Residents are uncertain if they will be able to return.
       
     
  Yoshida Natsuko, deputy general manager in charge of revitalization in Namie, Japan, stands in front of buildings damaged by the earthquake and evacuated due to radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi power plant explosion. Natsuko is working to open Namie back up to its residents, who have been displaced to various locations throughout Fukushima prefecture.
       
     
  A whole body counter sits in a small room in Soma Central Hospital. The whole body counters are being used by hospitals in Fukushima to measure radiation in children and adults. Dr. Sae Ochi uses the scanning device for measuring radiation, and countering resident's fears about radiation.
       
     
  Dr. Sae Ochi stands at the spot a house once stood, but was wiped away by the tsunami in Isobe, Japan. Ochi works at Soma Central Hospital, and monitors the effect the Fukushima Daiichi power plant explosion might have had on the health of residents in the region.
       
     
  Miyuki Fukuda(left) makes takoyaki with her family in Minamisoma. Fukuda's two daughters lost their homes in the tsunami and were evacuated when the Fukushima Daiichi power plant exploded.  
       
     
  A single road once lined with homes runs along the coast of Fukushima Prefecture. The tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake wiped away the homes in Isobe, Japan. The revitalization efforts in Isobe have been slow, and the area remains empty except for a few construction vehicles.
       
     
  Tsuchiyu residents participate in the obon festival, a three-day Buddhist festival honoring the spirits of ancestors in Tsuchiyu, Japan. People go back to their ancestral lands to celebrate their lives through dance, music and singing while wearing traditional garb. The town was a popular tourist destination due to its hot springs but was damaged by the Great East Japan Earthquake, and has lost many visitors. Tsuchiyu is attempting to rebuild itself after the earthquake, and the festival, is a sign of the town's efforts.
       
     
  Katsuichi Chiba, managing director of the Tsuchiyu hot spring cooperative, stands in front of a machine creating geothermal energy for the town. Tsuchiyu, known in Japan for its hot springs, was struck by the Great East Japan Earthquake. Chiba is attempting to revive the town through geothermal energy and reviving the hot springs. 
       
     
  A row of compact trailers fill a parking lot that has been turned into the Sasaya Higashi Housing District, in Fukushima, Japan. After the disaster evacuees were placed in temporary housing areas until they can find permanent housing or when they're allowed to return home. Evacuees living in these temporary housing districts have experienced health issues and stress-related problems as they try to cope with their life after the disaster.
       
     
  Tokiko Sugimoto's, 78, places a photo of her husband, Fumio Sugimoto, 80, holding their grandchild on the wall inside their trailer at the Sasaya Higashi Temporary Housing District in Fukushima. Tokiko and her husband were life long residents of Ukedo, a small area in Namie town. Their home was destroyed by the tsunami, and she had to be evacuated when the Fukushima Daiichi power plant exploded. The photo was one of the few items she was able to save. She has remained cheerful throughout the disaster, and hopes to move to a larger home soon.
       
     
  Yuko Kono, 77, talks about evacuating from Namie town to Fukushima as she points to her route on a map. Kono was a life long resident of Namie town, and owned a wedding preparation business until it was destroyed by the earthquake. Kono was evacuated from Namie when the Fukushima Power Plant exploded. Kono now lives in a temporary housing site with other evacuees.
       
     
 Yuko Kono, 77, looks away as she sits in her trailer at the Sasaya Higashi Temporary Housing District in Fukushima. Kono was a life long resident of Namie town, and owned a wedding preparation business until it was destroyed by the earthquake. Kono was evacuated from Namie when the Fukushima Power Plant exploded. Kono now lives in a temporary housing site with other evacuees.
       
     
  Oysters are grilled during a barbeque at the Sasaya Higashi Temporary Housing District community center in Fukushima.  The center hosts numerous events for residents who were evacuated from Namie town to still have community. Residents have begun to think about making Fukushima their permanent home instead of waiting to return to their homes.
       
     
  Shinichi Katahira, a peach farmer from Fukushima, Japan, stands in front of the peach trees in his orchard. Katahira had to decontaminate his land after the Fukushima power plant explosion, and has to take his fruit to a food monitoring center in order to determine the food’s safety before he can sell them at the market.
       
     
  Shinichi Katahira's employees tend to peach trees in his orchard in Fukushima, Japan. Katahira wants to expand the orchard, but his family believes he should quit, and focus on his other farms.          
       
     
fukushima-page-001.jpg
       
     
  The streets remain empty and quiet after the disaster in Namie, Japan. Residents haven't been allowed to move back until the radiation has reached the government's level of safety. Residents are uncertain if they will be able to return.
       
     

The streets remain empty and quiet after the disaster in Namie, Japan. Residents haven't been allowed to move back until the radiation has reached the government's level of safety. Residents are uncertain if they will be able to return.

  Yoshida Natsuko, deputy general manager in charge of revitalization in Namie, Japan, stands in front of buildings damaged by the earthquake and evacuated due to radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi power plant explosion. Natsuko is working to open Namie back up to its residents, who have been displaced to various locations throughout Fukushima prefecture.
       
     

Yoshida Natsuko, deputy general manager in charge of revitalization in Namie, Japan, stands in front of buildings damaged by the earthquake and evacuated due to radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi power plant explosion. Natsuko is working to open Namie back up to its residents, who have been displaced to various locations throughout Fukushima prefecture.

  A whole body counter sits in a small room in Soma Central Hospital. The whole body counters are being used by hospitals in Fukushima to measure radiation in children and adults. Dr. Sae Ochi uses the scanning device for measuring radiation, and countering resident's fears about radiation.
       
     

A whole body counter sits in a small room in Soma Central Hospital. The whole body counters are being used by hospitals in Fukushima to measure radiation in children and adults. Dr. Sae Ochi uses the scanning device for measuring radiation, and countering resident's fears about radiation.

  Dr. Sae Ochi stands at the spot a house once stood, but was wiped away by the tsunami in Isobe, Japan. Ochi works at Soma Central Hospital, and monitors the effect the Fukushima Daiichi power plant explosion might have had on the health of residents in the region.
       
     

Dr. Sae Ochi stands at the spot a house once stood, but was wiped away by the tsunami in Isobe, Japan. Ochi works at Soma Central Hospital, and monitors the effect the Fukushima Daiichi power plant explosion might have had on the health of residents in the region.

  Miyuki Fukuda(left) makes takoyaki with her family in Minamisoma. Fukuda's two daughters lost their homes in the tsunami and were evacuated when the Fukushima Daiichi power plant exploded.  
       
     

Miyuki Fukuda(left) makes takoyaki with her family in Minamisoma. Fukuda's two daughters lost their homes in the tsunami and were evacuated when the Fukushima Daiichi power plant exploded. 

  A single road once lined with homes runs along the coast of Fukushima Prefecture. The tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake wiped away the homes in Isobe, Japan. The revitalization efforts in Isobe have been slow, and the area remains empty except for a few construction vehicles.
       
     

A single road once lined with homes runs along the coast of Fukushima Prefecture. The tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake wiped away the homes in Isobe, Japan. The revitalization efforts in Isobe have been slow, and the area remains empty except for a few construction vehicles.

  Tsuchiyu residents participate in the obon festival, a three-day Buddhist festival honoring the spirits of ancestors in Tsuchiyu, Japan. People go back to their ancestral lands to celebrate their lives through dance, music and singing while wearing traditional garb. The town was a popular tourist destination due to its hot springs but was damaged by the Great East Japan Earthquake, and has lost many visitors. Tsuchiyu is attempting to rebuild itself after the earthquake, and the festival, is a sign of the town's efforts.
       
     

Tsuchiyu residents participate in the obon festival, a three-day Buddhist festival honoring the spirits of ancestors in Tsuchiyu, Japan. People go back to their ancestral lands to celebrate their lives through dance, music and singing while wearing traditional garb. The town was a popular tourist destination due to its hot springs but was damaged by the Great East Japan Earthquake, and has lost many visitors. Tsuchiyu is attempting to rebuild itself after the earthquake, and the festival, is a sign of the town's efforts.

  Katsuichi Chiba, managing director of the Tsuchiyu hot spring cooperative, stands in front of a machine creating geothermal energy for the town. Tsuchiyu, known in Japan for its hot springs, was struck by the Great East Japan Earthquake. Chiba is attempting to revive the town through geothermal energy and reviving the hot springs. 
       
     

Katsuichi Chiba, managing director of the Tsuchiyu hot spring cooperative, stands in front of a machine creating geothermal energy for the town. Tsuchiyu, known in Japan for its hot springs, was struck by the Great East Japan Earthquake. Chiba is attempting to revive the town through geothermal energy and reviving the hot springs. 

  A row of compact trailers fill a parking lot that has been turned into the Sasaya Higashi Housing District, in Fukushima, Japan. After the disaster evacuees were placed in temporary housing areas until they can find permanent housing or when they're allowed to return home. Evacuees living in these temporary housing districts have experienced health issues and stress-related problems as they try to cope with their life after the disaster.
       
     

A row of compact trailers fill a parking lot that has been turned into the Sasaya Higashi Housing District, in Fukushima, Japan. After the disaster evacuees were placed in temporary housing areas until they can find permanent housing or when they're allowed to return home. Evacuees living in these temporary housing districts have experienced health issues and stress-related problems as they try to cope with their life after the disaster.

  Tokiko Sugimoto's, 78, places a photo of her husband, Fumio Sugimoto, 80, holding their grandchild on the wall inside their trailer at the Sasaya Higashi Temporary Housing District in Fukushima. Tokiko and her husband were life long residents of Ukedo, a small area in Namie town. Their home was destroyed by the tsunami, and she had to be evacuated when the Fukushima Daiichi power plant exploded. The photo was one of the few items she was able to save. She has remained cheerful throughout the disaster, and hopes to move to a larger home soon.
       
     

Tokiko Sugimoto's, 78, places a photo of her husband, Fumio Sugimoto, 80, holding their grandchild on the wall inside their trailer at the Sasaya Higashi Temporary Housing District in Fukushima. Tokiko and her husband were life long residents of Ukedo, a small area in Namie town. Their home was destroyed by the tsunami, and she had to be evacuated when the Fukushima Daiichi power plant exploded. The photo was one of the few items she was able to save. She has remained cheerful throughout the disaster, and hopes to move to a larger home soon.

  Yuko Kono, 77, talks about evacuating from Namie town to Fukushima as she points to her route on a map. Kono was a life long resident of Namie town, and owned a wedding preparation business until it was destroyed by the earthquake. Kono was evacuated from Namie when the Fukushima Power Plant exploded. Kono now lives in a temporary housing site with other evacuees.
       
     

Yuko Kono, 77, talks about evacuating from Namie town to Fukushima as she points to her route on a map. Kono was a life long resident of Namie town, and owned a wedding preparation business until it was destroyed by the earthquake. Kono was evacuated from Namie when the Fukushima Power Plant exploded. Kono now lives in a temporary housing site with other evacuees.

 Yuko Kono, 77, looks away as she sits in her trailer at the Sasaya Higashi Temporary Housing District in Fukushima. Kono was a life long resident of Namie town, and owned a wedding preparation business until it was destroyed by the earthquake. Kono was evacuated from Namie when the Fukushima Power Plant exploded. Kono now lives in a temporary housing site with other evacuees.
       
     

Yuko Kono, 77, looks away as she sits in her trailer at the Sasaya Higashi Temporary Housing District in Fukushima. Kono was a life long resident of Namie town, and owned a wedding preparation business until it was destroyed by the earthquake. Kono was evacuated from Namie when the Fukushima Power Plant exploded. Kono now lives in a temporary housing site with other evacuees.

  Oysters are grilled during a barbeque at the Sasaya Higashi Temporary Housing District community center in Fukushima.  The center hosts numerous events for residents who were evacuated from Namie town to still have community. Residents have begun to think about making Fukushima their permanent home instead of waiting to return to their homes.
       
     

Oysters are grilled during a barbeque at the Sasaya Higashi Temporary Housing District community center in Fukushima.  The center hosts numerous events for residents who were evacuated from Namie town to still have community. Residents have begun to think about making Fukushima their permanent home instead of waiting to return to their homes.

  Shinichi Katahira, a peach farmer from Fukushima, Japan, stands in front of the peach trees in his orchard. Katahira had to decontaminate his land after the Fukushima power plant explosion, and has to take his fruit to a food monitoring center in order to determine the food’s safety before he can sell them at the market.
       
     

Shinichi Katahira, a peach farmer from Fukushima, Japan, stands in front of the peach trees in his orchard. Katahira had to decontaminate his land after the Fukushima power plant explosion, and has to take his fruit to a food monitoring center in order to determine the food’s safety before he can sell them at the market.

  Shinichi Katahira's employees tend to peach trees in his orchard in Fukushima, Japan. Katahira wants to expand the orchard, but his family believes he should quit, and focus on his other farms.          
       
     

Shinichi Katahira's employees tend to peach trees in his orchard in Fukushima, Japan. Katahira wants to expand the orchard, but his family believes he should quit, and focus on his other farms.